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picture of peopleTHS reader Christopher Lane brought this article to my attention, and asked me to forward it on to my readers. Yet another tragic consequence of dangerous and overused psychiatric drugs.

Mary Weiss, a mother in Minnesota, was one such person who wrote me last month. I’d been on the radio, talking about issues tied to my book. Ms. Weiss wrote an email afterwards, telling me about her son, Dan Markingson, who’d been diagnosed with schizophrenia, though she herself has serious doubts that the diagnosis was accurate.

Her son was encouraged to participate in a clinical trial at the University of Minnesota and other campuses comparing Seroquel, Risperdal, and Zyprexa for schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, and schizophreniform disorder, a loosely defined diagnosis for people suffering from “mood disorders with psychotic features.” The trial was sponsored by AstraZeneca, maker of Seroquel, which put the researchers and university in an obvious conflict of interest. Dan was given 800 mg of the drug.

Over 70% of patients in the trial dropped out. But Dan was strongly dissuaded from doing so and remained in it for five months. He’d been given a directive warning that if he failed to continue in the trial, he would be put in a regional treatment center. His mother did not know about the directive until it was too late.

Follow this link to read the full story.

A recent article reported on the results of a trial of the cholesterol-lowering drug Zytorin, which is a combination of Zocor and Zeita – made by Merck and Schering-Plough.

Zocor and Zeita lower cholesterol by different mechanisms, so the idea was that combining them into a single drug (Vytorin) would dramatically lower cholesterol and, they assumed, reduce heart disease.

They got the first part right. Vytorin did indeed lead to dramatic reductions in cholesterol levels in those who took the drug. However, it also increased the risk of heart disease – exactly the opposite result they were hoping for.

The worst part about this is that Merck & Schering-Plough sat on this data for almost two years, while over five million people around the world continued to take a drug that was proven to nearly double the risk of heart disease. Congress has launched a full-scale investigation and the NY Times is publicly demanding a new law to prevent this from happening again.

Yesterday another article was published in the Times with an update on the investigation, including emails sent by the lead investigator on the Vytorin trial indicating that Merck & Schering-Plough were deliberately delaying publication of the results of this trial.

Yet another case of gross malfeasance by the pharmaceutical industry. Consumers beware.

Related articles

  • Accusations of Delays in Releasing Drug Results
  • Doubt Cast on Two Drugs Used to Lower Cholesterol
  • Editorial: Overpromoted Cholesterol Drugs

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